User Guide

Introduction

PathWeb is an application designed to get road network data into your hands as effortlessly as possible. Here you can learn how to get started using PathWeb.

Quick start

Select a cycle

To get started, select a cycle from the cycle drop-down box:

A “cycle” is just a collection of routes. Your administrator chooses what cycles are available and what routes are contained in each cycle. Generally one cycle will represent one year’s worth of data, but this is not necessarily the case.

Find a route

There are two ways to find a route: the map, and the Find Road Section dialog.

Locating a route with the map

Once you’ve selected a cycle, the map should display all the routes you have available.

The pink lines show you what routes are available to view.
The pink lines show you what routes are available to view.

You can click and drag the map to move it around. If you have a mouse wheel, you can use it to zoom in and out. If you don’t have a mouse wheel, you can use the + and - buttons on the bottom right corner of the map to zoom. You may need to move or zoom in order to see what routes you have available to look at.

Once you have found the location you’re interested in, you can click on the colored line and PathWeb will take you to that location.

Locating a route with the Find Road Section dialog

If you don’t know where the route is geographically, but you do have information about the route, then you can probably find it in the Find Road Section dialog. Click on the Find Road Section button next to the Cycle dropdown box:

A dialog will pop up with several drop-down boxes. It may look something like this:

Your Find Road Section dialog may look a little different, but it should be very similar.
Your Find Road Section dialog may look a little different, but it should be very similar.

In this example, you would need to select the Cycle from the top dropdown box. Then PathWeb will allow you to select the Route, Direction, and then the specific Section you are interested in. After you have selected the section you’re interested in, click OK and you will be taken directly to it.

Viewing data

After you select a route, you can start looking at images and other data.

Windows

PathWeb has many windows you can open, close, move around, and resize. These windows display different things, and they function very similarly to the way windows do on a desktop computer. To see what windows you have available, click on the window button toward the bottom of the screen:

This will open up the window section in the sidebar:

Use the checkboxes to open or close windows.
Use the checkboxes to open or close windows.

Feel free to arrange your windows however you like by moving them around, resizing, etc.

Moving forward and backward

To move forward and backward, use the arrow buttons at the bottom of the screen. The outermost buttons step forward or backward by one image. The innermost buttons are continuous play / pause buttons.

You can also quickly jump from one location to another using the location slider at the bottom of the screen. A popup will show you the mile post / linear reference point.

Turning around

If you would like to quickly turn around and view images on the other side of the road, you can use the Turn around button to do so.

This only works when:

  • Data has been collected for the other side of the road.
  • The route name associated with that data is the same as your current route name.
  • The “mile post direction” on the other side of the road is opposite from your current route. For example, if you’re currently on an increasing or ascending route, the other side of the road must be decreasing or descending.

3D pavement images

If your organization uses a Pathway3D pavement camera, you will have a Road Surface window that displays images like this:

You will know you have a Pathway3D system if you see a “Surface Image” and “Surface Elevation” caption.
You will know you have a Pathway3D system if you see a “Surface Image” and “Surface Elevation” caption.

The Surface Image side shows you what the pavement looks like as you would expect from a normal black-and-white camera. The Surface Elevation side shows you the elevation of the pavement. Dark areas are deeper areas (like the bottoms of potholes) and bright areas are higher areas (like patches or debris).

Transverse profiles

3D images also allow you to view transverse profiles of the pavement.

Moving the mouse will cause the transverse profile to update.
Moving the mouse will cause the transverse profile to update.

If you’re not familiar with transverse profiles and 3D pavement images, it’s best explained with an example. Remember that the dark places on the Surface Elevation image represent “low” places on the pavement:

As the mouse hovers over the image, you can see a blue line stretching to the left and right. This blue line runs over two low spots: one closer to the left edge of the lane (highlighted in yellow), and one closer to the right edge of the lane (highlighted in red). You can see the depth of those two spots in the transverse profile window, highlighted with the same color.

Zooming into images

If you have a mouse wheel, you can zoom in on images. Just move your mouse over the image and scroll in and out with the mouse wheel. While zoomed in, you can move around in the image by clicking and dragging with your mouse.

If your organization has a Pathway3D camera, zooming works a little differently for the Road Surface window. Since the two images are showing the same pavement, the two images are synchronized. Moving around in one image will cause the other to move as well.

Map settings

Layers

The map comes with two different base layers that you can choose between: a roads layer and a satellite layer. Just click the square in the bottom left corner of the map to switch between the two.

If you have a URL to a custom GIS map service, you can also add these layers to your map. When the map window is open, click on the gear icon in the title bar.

This will cause the map settings window to open:

From there you can add a new layer:

Valid map service URLs may look similar to one of the following:

https://example.com/ExampleService/MapServer
https://example.com/ExampleService/MapServer/1
https://example.com/ExampleService/FeatureServer
https://example.com/ExampleService/FeatureServer/1
https://example.com/ExampleService/ImageServer
https://example.com/ExampleService/{level}/{col}/{row}.png

If your layer is obscuring another one, you can turn it off using the checkbox next to the layer’s title. You can also control which layers appear on top of other layers by re-ordering them using the up/down arrow buttons to the right. And finally, you can remove a layer using the X button.

Map coloring

In the Map Settings window, click on the Colors tab. There you can choose to color the lines on your map based on IRI or rutting values.